Lily Allen - It’s Not Me, It’s You

The ability to cause some listeners to vomit into their own hands whilst others appear bewitched by the 'Wordsworth of the MySpace generation' is some achievement.

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Released 17 Feb 2009 | EMI | By Martin Guttridge-Hewitt | Rating: 2-5
Lily Allen - It’s Not Me, It’s You

Just when you thought Lily's fame was simply achieved through being seen, and being seen to be outspoken, she reminds us of what got her to where she is. From the anything but annoying backing tracks of suspiciously familiar electro-pop to the lyricism - which if a now infamous press release is anything to go by, places her up there with some of the finest poets since the Enlightenment - it's all here.

"I want loads of clothes and fuck loads of diamonds/I heard people die trying to find them" states politically cavalier 'The Fear' - a strange comment on the celebrity culture of today fot someone so entrenched in it. It's fair to say there's a confusing ethic to the album. Lyrics, such as 'Not Fair', with its theme of being pissed off with the guy whose attitude to sex is take take take and climaxes too early, are put to a driving pop homage to country and western.

The tracks play out in a very glossy pop way, although some of the production lacks what contemporaries have. The key problem here is the general mismatch the album suffers from. Titles such as the drug themed 'Everyone's At It', or the hilariously named 'Fuck You' sit on the back of an album filled with music that really isn't very good, unless you're middle-aged, middle-of-the-road, or 14. Perhaps this is the point - the subjects up for discussion in Lily's work are neither approved nor shunned by the star. It's the 21st century; who knows what we think.

The ability to cause some listeners to vomit into their own hands whilst others appear bewitched by the 'Wordsworth of the MySpace generation' is some achievement. By the time 'Chinese' kicks in, an evening with a takeaway may seem like a far more wholesome choice. Guaranteed to be enjoyed by millions, well-received by some, it's all really too subjective to comment.