Holy Ghost Revival - Twilight Exit

The equivalent to a band who started out perhaps as a tribute act and then decided to write a few of their own numbers.

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Released 1 Sep 2008 | 1965 | By Lauren Potts | Rating: 2-5
Holy Ghost Revival - Twilight Exit

For a spate of niche bands in the 1980s, myth and metal mixed rather well. And to those fans who hail the likes of Blind Guardian and Dream Theater, there's a certain amount of love for tales of dragon-slaying and mystical lands. Seattle's Holy Ghost Revival is a nod to those forerunners; the equivalent to a band who started out perhaps as a tribute act and then decided to write a few of their own numbers. In singer Conor Kiley, they have found a believable cross between Axl Rose before he got fat, bald and bitter, and the tuneful operatics of Helloween's Andy Deris. In typical German power metal style, the lyrics run amock with fantastic metaphors and gothic overtones, and lest we forget, religious allusions as featured in 'The Gospel According To Judas'.

Overall, each track allows for the mandatory theatrical wailing as typified by 'Westbrain Bandana' and accompanied in live performance, no doubt, by visually entertaining posturing and gesticulations. Typically, many of the tracks feature guitar melodies which are reminiscent of Iron Maiden circa their fantasy era; in particular, 'Burn Down Your House', which makes for an odd contrast which the consistent Southern blues-rock organ found in 'Wolfking of LA'.

Whilst metal fans will undoubtedly revel in Twilight Exit's nostalgic overtones, the album as a whole does little to excite past the first number, meandering halfway with the piano-driven 'Old Hollywood Is Over' and the almost identical 'Empire Skies' - both of which probably would have benefitted from a rousing chorus of "woah-oh-ohs" just to hit the cliché home a little harder. The LP eventually peters out with yet another slushy power ballad in the style of a half-arsed 'November Rain', which, on the whole, sums up how Holy Ghost Revival begin with promise but slowly and quite visibly descend into parody. Think Spinal Tap and you're almost there.